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The standard "I quit social media for like five minutes blah blah blah" post.

Every five minutes someone writes a 4,000 word article about how they gave up social media for a minute, a month, a year -- whatever time frame it may be -- and then lists how they were more mindful, connected, and could just about levitate since they evolved so much without being on social media.

Fair enough.

A few years ago I took summer off from Twitter, removed the thing from my phone. Happily, that was during Obergefell vs. Hodges.

Well, I'm not quitting social media. My Twitter feed is a finally honed mixture of "Never Trump", Deplorables, center-left, cat videos, satire, and stupid human tricks. And Instagram. Heck. I could take stupid photos all day and leave witless commentary about them.

So Facebook.

That's a unique sewer of a place.

I stay on the thing for two reasons: you can't manage other people's pages if you don't have a profile, and it's the only way I see photos of my extended family and find out what my family is doing.

This past ye…

The Bread of Life

This morning, the church sermon was on The Road to Emmaus (Luke 24:13-35)

Towards the end, the pastor pointed out how the two men finally recognized Jesus because he broke bread with them. He then went on to reference the many times bread was associated with Jesus. The bread of life, breaking of bread, miracle of the five loaves and two fish, the symbol of bread during communion--Jesus was even born in Bethlehem, which means "house of bread."
A faint though crept into my head, and though I've not worked it out too far, or even decided if I have the energy to think on it much, I did share it with my friend after church was over.
"Isn't it interesting how important bread is in Christianity," I said, "and how our current health consciousness, by Christian people even, has vilified bread."
Our obsession with "clean food" and "clean eating" and low carbs has targeted grains and bread as bad for the body. Jesus is the Bread of Life, …

The Christian blogosphere, course corrections, and pink tractors.

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I left the heavy duty Christian blogging ("theo blogging" we called it back in the early 2000's) behind several years ago for conscious reasons. I wrote about it, most recently, in a post entitled "Being Someone of No Reputation", which I wrote in all sincerity.

I am reminded of all of it after reading an article, "Who's In Charge Of The Christian Blogosphere", and the ensuing Twitter response. I entered into the fray for a short while, but really lacked the energy.

Permit me to tell you two stories.

I grew up on a farm with three sisters and one brother. My father didn't have us girls drive the farm equipment. Only my brother drove the trucks, tractors, and combines. I once heard a woman derisively say that my father had "pink tractor syndrome", i.e. that he didn't think a woman could or should drive big farm equipment.

My father had seen two very serious (and bloody) accidents involving my grandfather (his dad) and big farm eq…

All our little gods.

The food we do or do not eat.

The exercise we do or do not get.

The injustices we do or do not care about.

The outrage we do or do not have.

It is an endless list, the little gods we make in our life. They creep into our lives, starting first as an innocent concern, grounded not in the bad but in good intentions. Then they settle in and we start to see them first and foremost in all we do and say. Soon they occupy our mind in every waking moment.

Perhaps in an attempt to combat this, we turn to "mindfulness" and believe that if we are simply more aware of what we are doing, if we force consciousness onto our actions, we will strip the thing of its power and make it benign again.

Until mindfulness, and the pursuit of simpleness, becomes its own god.

We can't add a day to our life or an hour to our day, but we careen from one extreme to another, all in or all out. The simple pleasures of what life offers are smoothed down, the highs and lows made equal by guilt or self-rig…